Over 10k people being monitored by Probation Service, including 105 life-sentence prisoners

Over 10k people being monitored by Probation Service, including 105 life-sentence prisoners
File photo of a prison officer.

More than 100 life-sentence prisoners are under supervision in the community after being released from jail.

In total, over 8,900 men and nearly 1,400 women are being managed by the Probation Service.

Almost 10,300 people are being monitored by the Probation Service, with 37% of them in the east of the country.

Nearly 8,800 are in the community, while over 1,500 are still in custody.

Some people are working in charity shops, public areas or sports facilities after being released from prison, while other high-risk offenders are more closely monitored.

105 life-sentence prisoners are on supervision in the community.

Fiona Ní Chinneide from the Irish Penal Reform Trust does not believe people should automatically be jailed forever if they get a life sentence.

"By definition, somebody receives a life sentence because they've committed among the most grave offenses, but there are many other considerations including safety within the prison system and for people to have hope and to be working positively towards eventual release, which might be decades later," she said.

Certainly it's better for the person themselves and also for the prison environment.

The Probation Service has 35 community-based offices across the country, and it also has staff based in Ireland's 12 prisons.

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