O'Sullivan: Yes vote will not affect school teachings

O'Sullivan: Yes vote will not affect school teachings

The Education Minister Jan O'Sullivan says teaching about relationships in schools will not be affected by the Marriage Equality Referendum, if it passes.

Last week, a group of teachers advocating a No vote this Friday said that if the referendum is passed they would be obliged to teach a new model of marriage to children.

Minister O'Sullivan says the ethos of religious schools is protected under the law.

Ms O'Sullivan said school curriculums will not be changed if the electorate votes Yes on Friday.

She said: "No it won't. Currently we have legislation that protects the ethos of religious schools, and they are allowed under the law to protect that ethos in their schools.

"Now, there is no intention of changing any curriculum."

Meanwhile, the Jobs Minister Richard Bruton has denied the Government has botched the referendum debate by allowing issues like surrogacy to dominate the campaign.

The issue has arisen as one of the chief concerns of many No voters, despite Referendum Commission chief Kevin Cross's statement that the outcome of Friday's ballot will have no impact on surrogacy.

Jobs Minister Richard Bruton says he believes the referendum will be "very tight".

He said: "I believe the Coalition has dealt with the surrogacy issue sufficiently, and I think people have been very forthright in explaining what has been going on.

"That doesn't mean you won't have conflicting view being offered, that's the nature of debate.

"I think people have the opportunity now to distill what is being said. This is a very simple proposition which is allowing gay union to have the Constitutional protection a marrgiage."

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