O’Sullivan ‘deeply disappointed’ with ASTI rejection of junior cycle reform

O’Sullivan ‘deeply disappointed’ with ASTI rejection of junior cycle reform

The Education Minister has said she is “deeply disappointed” at the decision of the country's largest secondary teachers union to reject the latest junior cycle proposals.

ASTI members voted against the proposals by 55% to 45%. ASTI President Máire G Ní Chiarba has said the result proves that teachers “do not trust the Government to adequately resource and support schools as they implement the significant changes required by the junior cycle proposals,”

However, secondary teachers in the TUI have voted to accept the proposals by more than two to one - at 69% percent to 31%.

In a statement Minister Jan O'Sullivan has said she will consult with parents, students and management bodies in the coming weeks.

“I welcome the strong endorsement for the agreed programme for reform by the Teachers’ Union of Ireland. These proposals are the result of approximately nine months of negotiation between my Department and both teacher unions. The new framework for junior cycle has the capacity to deliver real reform in partnership with teachers,” read O’Sullivan’s statement.

“However, the decision by 55% of ASTI members who voted to reject the agreed proposals is deeply disappointing. That said, I note that the ASTI intends to engage with its members in relation to outstanding concerns.”

Statement by Minister Jan O’Sullivan on the teaching unions ballots in full:

“I welcome the strong endorsement for the agreed programme for reform by the Teachers’ Union of Ireland. These proposals are the result of approximately nine months of negotiation between my Department and both teacher unions. The new framework for junior cycle has the capacity to deliver real reform in partnership with teachers.

“However, the decision by 55% of ASTI members who voted to reject the agreed proposals is deeply disappointing. That said, I note that the ASTI intends to engage with its members in relation to outstanding concerns.

“Over the coming period I will consult with other education stakeholders, including students, parents and management bodies.

“In recent weeks the cohort of students who will sit the reformed Junior Cycle have begun 2nd year. It is unfortunate that in the long negotiation on junior cycle reform that their voice has often been lost in the debate. Their interests will be to the forefront of my thinking on the way forward in implementing junior cycle reform in the coming weeks.”

READ MORE: ASTI rejects junior cycle reform proposals


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