One in three have downloaded something illegally from internet: report

One in three have downloaded something illegally from internet: report

One in three people in Ireland have downloaded something illegally from the internet while over half of all internet users are unaware of the potential penalties of doing so, according to new research.

That’s one of the findings of a new survey from iReach Insights who provide a range of research and market intelligence services in Ireland and Europe.

1000 adults were asked about their behaviour and their opinions regarding illegal downloads for the survey.

The findings include:

* 26% of people in Ireland don’t download music for free as they prefer physical copies of music/movies.

* 52% of people in Ireland don’t know the penalties and consequences for illegal downloading.

* 44% think that more serious consequences would stop them from downloading illegally from the internet.

* 57% think that is the responsibility of internet providers to prevent illegal downloading

Reacting to the findings iReach reminded internet users they are subject to sanctions by some internet providers as they try to establish rules to stop illegal downloading.

The report goes on to reveal that half of adults in Ireland (47%) buy music in store wit females (52%) are more likely to buy so than males (40%).

Buying music in store is more common in people of 55+ years (60%) than in those of 18-34 years (35%).

40% buy it online, 21% subscribe to paid streaming services and 22% download it illegally for free. This proportion decreases with age. In fact, people of 18-34 years (31%) download more than those of 55+ years (9%).

One in three have downloaded something illegally from internet: report

Among people who don’t download music for free, 35% of don’t because they know it’s illegal. 26% prefer physical copies of music/movies, 25% are worried about downloading a virus and 21% think that is unethical.

In general, one in three (35%) have downloaded something illegally for the internet.

Half of people in Ireland (52%) don’t know the penalties and consequences for illegal downloading [Male; 47%, Female; 57%]. 27% know and 21% are unsure.

Of those who have downloaded something illegally from the internet, 44% state that if there were more serious consequences for illegal downloading that this would stop them from doing it. 28% answered “no”, with males (36%) taking more risk than females (17%) and 28% don’t know.

57% think that is the responsibility of internet providers to try and prevent illegal downloading. 36% think that it is the IT security organisations responsibility, 24% think it’s the government’s responsibility and 20% think the responsibility lies with the police.

49% of people think the internet and online illegal downloading isn’t policed well in Ireland. 8% think it’s well policed and 43% are unsure.

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