Oberstown centre working with HIQA to address issues: Director

Oberstown centre working with HIQA to address issues: Director

Update 3.45pm: Concerns are being raised about the use of "single separation" at the Oberstown Children Detention Campus in North Dublin.

A HIQA inspection found young people were locked up over 3 thousand times last year.

It’s only meant to be used as a last resort where the children pose a risk to themselves or others.

Tanya Ward is CEO of the Children’s Rights Alliance and she said the reasons for and oversight of single separation confinement shoud always be set out clearly.

"That woud be of concern to us and it is an area where Oberstown does fail in the HIQA inspection."

Oberstown centre working with HIQA to address issues: Director

Update 3pm: The Director of Oberstown has accepted the findings of the latest HIQA report and have said they are working together with the authority to produce an Action Plan addressing the key recommendations.

Pat Bergin went on to also say centre staff were also pleased that the HIQA report documents the progress that has been made at Oberstown to date.

“However as the report highlights, Oberstown is going through a period of major change and challenges remain. The Action Plan that has been developed will assist in meeting these and further build on the progress achieved at the Campus as a single facility, over the last year.”

Oberstown centre working with HIQA to address issues: Director

Earlier: A HIQA report has found that only 2 of 10 standards at the Oberstown Children Detention Campus in Dublin were compliant.

It follows an announced inspection of the youth facility in March.

The report shows that of 10 standards assessed at the child detention centre, two were complaint, 6 had moderate non-compliance and two were major breaches.

Inspectors identified two serious risks over the management of medicines.

An immediate action plan was issued over the safe administration of a prescribed medicine, and ensuring that measures were in place to store drugs securely.

There also continued to be a number of instances of juvenile spending prolonged periods of time locked up for behavioural issues and a lack of oversight in the monitoring of this.

HIQA did find that healthcare on the campus had improved, children were listened to, given information about their rights and their educational needs were met.

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