Nurse gets life for murdering mother on Christmas Eve

Nurse gets life for murdering mother on Christmas Eve
Greta Dudko.

A nurse has been convicted and jailed for life for murdering her mother during a Christmas Eve row in Dublin four years ago.

Greta Dudko struck Anna Butautiene twice over the head with a bottle after throwing her up against a wall at the home they shared at Station Court Hall in Clonsilla.

She was tried last year but the jury could not agree on a verdict.

The 36-year-old Lithuanian nurse displayed no emotion as the jury found her guilty of murdering her mother in an 11 to one majority decision.

Greta Dudko had admitted manslaughter but she denied that she had intended to kill her mother Anna Butateine during a row at their Dublin home on Christmas Eve 2010.

The evidence was that Greta Dudko threw her mother against a wall until she slumped to the ground at which point she got a bottle from the kitchen and struck the 55-year-old over the head with it twice.

There were family tensions about Greta Dudko's marriage and she had increasingly turned to alcohol and prescription drugs.

The court heard her brother Tomas attended the trial last week, but there was no family here today, and no victim impact evidence was heard before Mr Justice Paul Carney imposed the mandatory life sentence.


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