Number of teen pregnancies halves in last decade, CSO stats reveal

Number of teen pregnancies halves in last decade, CSO stats reveal

By Joe Leogue

We’re waiting longer to have children, having fewer of them, and the number of teenage pregnancies has fallen by more than half in the last 10 years.

That is according to the Central Statistics Office and its Vital Statistics annual report which relates to 2016,. It documents the underlying figures of births and deaths that took place in the State that year.

The number of births in Ireland dropped by over 15% since 2010, but the rate of births of twins has risen.

The average age of mothers giving birth in 2016 was 32.7 years. Mothers under 30 accounted for just over a quarter (27.7%) of births in 2016, compared with 39.5% ten years previously.

Circulatory disease and cancer remain the largest causes of deaths in Ireland, accounting for 30.1% and 29.9% of deaths, respectively. Meanwhile, four-fifths of suicides in 2016 were men.

Carol Anne Hennessy, a statistician at the CSO, said: “The number of births has fallen by 15.1% since 2010 and 2.6% since 2015.

“There were 63,841 live births in Ireland in 2016 with 32,709 males and 31,132 females. The 2016 total is 2.4% lower than 10 years previously (2006) when there were 65,425 live births.

“There were 1,101 births to mothers under 20 years in 2016, down from 2,335 in 2006, a decrease of 52.8%. Over one in three (36.6%) of all births were outside of marriage/civil partnership in 2016. The comparable figure, 30 years earlier, in 1986 was 9.6%.

“Over the past 25 years, the twinning rate has increased significantly, from a low of 11.7 in 1991 to a high of 19.0 in 2016. In 2016, the number of multiple live births was 1,215, consisting of 1,189 sets of twins, 24 sets of triplets and 2 sets of quadruplets,” she said.

Ms Hennessy also detailed the statistics on deaths recorded in 2016.

“There were 30,667 deaths in Ireland in 2016, an increase of 540 on the 2015 figure,” she said.

“Diseases of the circulatory system accounted for 9,237 or 30.1% of deaths and 9,171 or 29.9% of deaths were attributed to malignant neoplasms, while deaths from diseases of the respiratory system numbered 3,935 or 12.8% of all deaths.

“Over 1.4% (437) of all deaths were due to suicide in 2016, 80.1% (350) of which were male,” she said.

The CSO’s Vital Statistics annual report also examined infant deaths and neonatal deaths — defined as infants under four weeks old — that were recorded in 2016.

“There were 194 deaths of infants aged less than one year in 2016, giving an infant mortality rate of 3.0 deaths per 1,000 live births compared with 3.4 in 2015,” said Ms Hennessy.

“Over a third (37.6%) of all infant deaths occurred within the first day of birth while 59.8% occurred within the first week.

“Congenital malformations, deformations, and chromosomal abnormalities accounted for 39.7% of infant deaths while certain conditions originating in the perinatal period accounted for 44.8% of infant deaths in 2016.

“There were 147 neonatal deaths registered in 2016, a neonatal mortality rate of 2.3 deaths per 1,000 live births,” she said.

The CSO said the natural increase — the number of births minus deaths — in 2016 was 33,174, a decrease of 6.3% on the 2015 figure.

The natural increase 10 years previously in 2006 was 36,937, over 11.3% more than the 2016 figure.

    CSO stats for 2016 at a glance

  • 63,841 live births in 2016 — 32,709 boys and 31,132 girls.
  • The birth rate in 2016 was 13.5 per 1,000 population, 0.5 lower than the birth rate in 2015.
  • Ireland had the highest average age at maternity within the EU 28 countries in 2016 at 32.7 years, followed by Spain, where the average age of mothers at birth was 32.0 years.
  • The percentage of births to teenagers was 1.7% (1,101) of all births in 2016 — the lowest percentage of births to mothers under 20 since 1960.
  • In 2016 there were 6.9% (or 4,379) of births to mothers aged 40 and over.
  • It was the highest percentage of births recorded to this age group since 1968 when 6.9% of all births was also attributed to this age group.
  • In 2016, 40,455 (or 63.4%) births occurred within marriage/civil partnership and 23,386 (or 36.6%) births occurred outside marriage/civil partnership.
  • The twinning rate — the number of sets of live twins per 1,000 maternities which resulted in live births — has increased significantly over the past 24 years — from 11.7 in 1991 to an all-time high of 19.0 in 2016.
  • The highest number of births in 2016 was recorded in the National Maternity hospital, Holles Street with 14.0% (8,955) of all births.
  • Outside of Dublin, Cork University Maternity hospital had the highest number of births, 7,582 or 11.9% of all births in 2016.
  • There were 30,667 deaths in Ireland in 2016 of which 15,620 were male and 15,047 were female.
  • There were 9,408 deaths due to neoplasms, or abnormal growths — in 2016, or 2.0 per 1,000 of population. Of these, 9,171 were due to malignant neoplasms — cancers. Of these, 4,801 deaths were of males and 4,370 female.
  • There were 9,237 deaths attributed to diseases of the circulatory system in 2016, of which 4,768 were deaths of males and 4,469 were deaths of females.
  • The number of deaths from external causes of injury and poisoning occurring in 2016 was 1,323, of which 940 were males and 383 females.
  • Almost 2.5 times as many males died due to external causes compared to females in 2016.
  • There were 437 deaths due to intentional self-harm in 2016, 350 (or 80.1%) males and 87 (or 19.9%) females.
  • The highest number of deaths, 101, recorded from intentional self-harm were in the 35-44 age group (23.1%).

More on this topic

Online shopping and level of savings reach record levels in Ireland, amid lockdownOnline shopping and level of savings reach record levels in Ireland, amid lockdown

21 babies born to mothers aged under 16, CSO figures reveal21 babies born to mothers aged under 16, CSO figures reveal

Number of births in Ireland drops 20% in 10 years, CSO figures revealNumber of births in Ireland drops 20% in 10 years, CSO figures reveal

Nearly a quarter of Irish businesses have ceased trading temporarily, new figures revealNearly a quarter of Irish businesses have ceased trading temporarily, new figures reveal


More in this Section

Dublin Zoo opens for first time in 11 weeks, with social distancing in placeDublin Zoo opens for first time in 11 weeks, with social distancing in place

Covid-19 death toll sparks calls to expand Fair Deal to provide elder care in the homeCovid-19 death toll sparks calls to expand Fair Deal to provide elder care in the home

Hosepipe ban 'increasingly likely' as demand for water surges 20% in dry conditionsHosepipe ban 'increasingly likely' as demand for water surges 20% in dry conditions

Search resumes at Lough Mask for missing five-year-old boySearch resumes at Lough Mask for missing five-year-old boy


Lifestyle

Bless me readers, I have sinned. This week, we had more than a few visitors around, some water was wasted in the back garden and I was judgmental about my friends’ parenting style.Learner Dad: The highlight was when my daughter roared, ‘this is just like being on holidays’

Wearing gloves when out in public has become more prevalent and so has pulling them on in the garden during lockdown, writes Ray RyanIreland's growing love for gardening

Of all the times when Connell comes to Marianne’s rescue, the moment when he finally sticks it to her brother Alan is the one I’ve been looking forward to the most.Normal People recap: A grand finale with pocket rockets and swoonsome kisses

Dublin songstress, Imelda May.Imelda May returns with spoken word album Slip Of The Tongue

More From The Irish Examiner