'Not everybody aware of impact' of flood relief works on Cork city, claims #StopTheWall

'Not everybody aware of impact' of flood relief works on Cork city, claims #StopTheWall
A human chain on Sullivan's Quay for the Save Cork City protest today. Pic: Dan Linehan

A major protest has taken place in Cork city today to highlight opposition to a planned €120m flood relief project.

Campaigners say that although measures are necessary to protect the city, the approach by the Office of Public Works of building walls and embankments could actually increase the flood risk.

The Save Cork City group urged residents and business people to join a 'human chain' and show their concerns at the lack of consultation about the proposed works, which will take 10 years to complete.

The 'human chain' gathered at Sullivan's Quay and in Fitzgerald's Park to highlight opposition to the scheme.

They were joined by a gathering of boats from Naomhóga Chorcaí at the Port of Cork.

A gathering of Naomhóga Chorcaí boats at the Port of Cork to raise awareness of the Save Cork City protest today. Pic: Dan Linehan
A gathering of Naomhóga Chorcaí boats at the Port of Cork to raise awareness of the Save Cork City protest today. Pic: Dan Linehan

Local architect Polly Magee says the scheme will involve the destruction of much of Cork's historic Georgian quays.

She said: "We would encourage anybody who lives or works in the city to come in and wear red, if you can, it's the only way to make an impact because there is no democracy in this process.

"There is no chance to appeal to An Bord Pleanála, and this is the only way people can say what they feel."


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