Non-Irish nationals harder hit by job losses

Non-Irish nationals harder hit by job losses

A return to employment growth will depend on a resumption of domestic demand, according to Dr Ronnie O’Toole, chief economist with National Irish Bank.

But data from the first quarter of the year showed that demand in the building and construction sectors declined by 16%. In public administration, it was down by 25.

The evidence was that the vast majority of employment in developed economies related to domestic consumption.

But the good news was that the economy grew by 2.7% in the first quarter, ending a losing streak of eight consecutive quarters of contraction.

Dr O’Toole said that non-Irish nationals had experience the worst of the recession with unemployment at 30% for this group over the past two years compared to 9% for Irish born.

This was not, as was commonly believed, because non-Irish nationals were concentrated in industries which had contracted the most, such as construction.

In every economic sector the loss of jobs by non-Irish nationals had been much more severe than for the Irish.

For example, the employment of Irish nationals in the hospitality sector rose 5% over the past two years, while that of non-nationals had fallen by 23% This might be due to differences in skill levels or union membership.

Another possibility was that family-owned enterprises which account for 40% of all local services jobs were ‘soaking up’ unemployed Irish family members.

There was also a ‘pull’ element with the strong Polish economy attracting expatriates home.

Polish GDP was expected to grow by 3% this year. Wages had increased there in recent months.

Net emigration had resumed, although this was entirely composed of non-Irish national workers.

Net migration was around 46,000 people of working age over the past year, with net exits of non-national workers of 60,000.

There was no evidence yet of net emigration among Irish nationals, Dr O’Toole said.

Net emigration could remain high at 30,000 per annum over the next two years, though this was lower than the current level.

Article courtesy of the Evening Echo newspaper.


More in this Section

Status yellow weather warning in place as country braces for snow and icy conditionsStatus yellow weather warning in place as country braces for snow and icy conditions

Tom Jones praises Irish talent on The Voice UK as Cork and Galway natives take to the stageTom Jones praises Irish talent on The Voice UK as Cork and Galway natives take to the stage

Extinction Rebellion takes its message to the doors of Dublin while canvassing in the cityExtinction Rebellion takes its message to the doors of Dublin while canvassing in the city

Varadkar continues to rule out working with Sinn FéinVaradkar continues to rule out working with Sinn Féin


Lifestyle

As Stockton’s Wing release a retrospective album, Mike Hanrahan tells Donal O’Keeffe about getting back on the road, and his love of cookingStill a beautiful affair: Mike Hanrahan talks about getting back on the road with Stockton's Wing

An ongoing cull is resulting in a major reduction in the deer population in one of the country’s most visited natural attractions.Donal Hickey: Deer birth patterns evolving

A Courtmacsherry neighbour, Kathy Gannon tells me that when the tide is out, the vast acres of clean, grey mud of the bay reflect the sun in splendour in the clear, sharp air.Damien Enright: ‘How enchanting for humanity that we have birds’

It is hard to believe today but the former island of Ringarogy in West Cork was once home to around 800 people.Islands of Ireland: Ring a Ringarogy

More From The Irish Examiner