No verdict yet in murder trial

The jury in the trial of a Dublin man charged with the murder of an armed supermarket raider has been sent home for a second night having failed to reach a verdict in the Central Criminal Court today.

David Wilson (aged 22) of Marigold Avenue, Darndale denies murdering Paul Howe (aged 22) in the car park at the rear of Supervalu on the Howth Road as he tried to make his escape following a robbery on October 8, 2008.

The jury of seven men and five women have now been deliberating for nine hours and 24 minutes over two days.

At 11am this morning Mr Justice George Birmingham told the jurors he could now accept a majority verdict of no less than 10/2.

The prosecution claim Mr Wilson stabbed Mr Howe, of Glenshane Crescent, Tallaght seven times, with the knife used in the armed raid, having chased him from the store.

During the trial, the court heard evidence that Mr Wilson and three other men kicked and punched the deceased as he lay on the ground before Mr Wilson stabbed him walked off and then ran back to stab him again.

The jury had been told there were three verdicts open to them; guilty of murder, not guilty of murder or not guilty of murder but guilty of manslaughter either on the grounds of self-defence or provocation.

The jury will resume its deliberations at 11am tomorrow.


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