'No big surprises' in Leaving Cert business and art papers

'No big surprises' in Leaving Cert business and art papers

Students were very happy with both the Leaving Cert business and art papers, which featured a wide choice of questions and “no big surprises".

“It was a very fair paper, featuring a lot about entrepreneurs and entrepreneurship,” said Margo McGann, ASTI business spokeswoman and a teacher at St Augustines College in Dungarvan.

“I will say though that students would need to have given very detailed and specific answers.”

Topical references on the paper would have included a question referring to the Irish Nurses and Midwives Association (INMO) and industrial action, the environment and the benefits of the Eurozone, she added.

“Students who studied past papers and worked hard will be richly rewarded. The short questions were a lovely selection, with something for everyone,” said Keith Hannigan, business teacher at the Institute of Education in Dublin.

Ruairi Farrell, TUI subject representative and a teacher at Coláiste Chraobh Abhainn in Kilcoole, Co Wicklow, said the full course was examined and that there were topical and modern twists: “There was an interesting question asking them to name an imported product that we could not make ourselves. Another one looked at how increasing the minimum wage might affect business; this was a different perspective to take as it’s usually focused on the employee’s point of view.”

Mr Farrell said the ordinary level paper used accessible language, and he welcomed its focus on environmental concerns:

There was a real trend on the ordinary level paper looking at environmental issues, with students asked about biodegradable cups and environmentally-friendly business.

Students would have liked the question relating to a job at the Kildare Village shopping centre, said Mr Farrell. “This is the type of part-time or summer job they would be looking at themselves, and I liked that they were asked to work out their own take-home pay and net salary.”

Many students who sat the Art, History and Appreciation exam in the afternoon would have "breathed a big sigh of relief", according to TUI representative Clodagh O’Hara.

"In my own school, students were absolutely thrilled. If the students had studied the books, they would be very happy today with the exam."

Da Vinci made an appearance on both the higher and ordinary level paper this year.

"That would have been a nice surprise for students," Ms O'Hara said.

"I am very happy with the higher level paper, and the art teachers forum online seems to be as well. There was something for every student, and there were no unexpected surprises. The ordinary level exam had a good, fair paper as well. There was a good emphasis on impressionism and post-impressionism which would have pleased a lot of students."

If the kids prepared, they would have been well able to apply themselves to that paper.

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