New study to examine impact of abuse on family relationships

New study to examine impact of abuse on family relationships

The author of a new study claims siblings of childhood sexual abuse victims are often overlooked by support services.

The DCU-led research is looking at the impact abuse has on family relationships and siblings’ experiences of learning about child sexual abuse.

The aim is to identify the support needs of siblings in the aftermath of disclosure of child sexual abuse.

The researchers say it has been shown that the absence of information about siblings’ experiences suggests this is a group whose voice is “unheard” when considering the full effects of this on the family unit.

Dr Rosaleen McElvaney and Dr Simon Dunne from the School of Nursing and Human Sciences led the study, and Dr McElvaney says that siblings are often the "neglected population".

“This is a neglected population, yet siblings themselves and those working in the field are only too painfully aware of the ripple effects of sexual abuse on the family unit," she said.

"We hope that this study will raise awareness about the impact of sexual abuse on family relationships and give siblings a voice - sexual abuse hurts everyone.”

Dr Simon Dunne added: “Siblings of victims of childhood sexual abuse are often overlooked by support services and under-studied in research.

This means that very little is known about how disclosures of childhood sexual abuse have an impact on them and their relationships with other family members, including their relationships to victims of childhood sexual abuse themselves.

"Our purpose with this national survey is to try find out more about how disclosures of childhood sexual abuse impact on siblings’ relationships in their families, and what can be done to address the support needs of these siblings in the aftermath of a disclosure of childhood sexual abuse," he said.

The research will be carried out via and online survey, which you can access here.

More on this topic

Cork Sexual Violence Centre seeing more women assaulted while on holidayCork Sexual Violence Centre seeing more women assaulted while on holiday

Siblings of children who experienced sexual abuse to be part of studySiblings of children who experienced sexual abuse to be part of study

Approximately 75% of 417 sex offenders in Irish prisons 'unsuitable' for rehabilitation programmeApproximately 75% of 417 sex offenders in Irish prisons 'unsuitable' for rehabilitation programme

Brazilian footballer Neymar meets with police over rape claimBrazilian footballer Neymar meets with police over rape claim

More in this Section

Recently uncovered love letter reveals director's 'schoolboy crush' on Maureen O'HaraRecently uncovered love letter reveals director's 'schoolboy crush' on Maureen O'Hara

Over 7,500 children waiting more than a year for occupational therapy assessmentOver 7,500 children waiting more than a year for occupational therapy assessment

Service commemorates British Army’s deployment in Northern IrelandService commemorates British Army’s deployment in Northern Ireland

Funeral of Roy Keane's father Mossie hears he 'was very proud of all his children'Funeral of Roy Keane's father Mossie hears he 'was very proud of all his children'


Lifestyle

Incarcerated in Auschwitz and other Nazi death camps Zuzana Ruzickova somehow survived and went on to create the complete recordings of her beloved Bach, writes James Lawless.Book review: Nazi horrors replaced by brutal Soviets for piano player

The Menu was delighted to make recent mention of a new UCC postgraduate diploma in Irish food culture and is equally pleased to announce availability of two new bursaries for same.The Menu: Food news with Joe McNamee

Milky skincare ingredients keep skin fresh and often suit the whole family, it’s moo-vellous, writes Rachel Marie Walsh.Product watch: Milky skincare ingredients for the whole family

George Orwell’s classic novel foretold a lot, but the manner in which we’ve handed over our personal data to faceless corporatocracies is doubleplus-ungood, says Suzanne Harrington.How we sleepwalked into George Orwell’s nightmarish vision

More From The Irish Examiner