NBRU want more action taken on anti-social behaviour on trains

NBRU want more action taken on anti-social behaviour on trains

The National Rail and Bus Union wants more steps to be taken to address anti-social behaviour on trains.

It is looking for a dedicated transport police service after more than 1,000 recorded disturbances on trains since the start of last year.

Irish Rail says it is working closely with the Gardaí to tackle the problem.

But NBRU General Secretary Dermot O'Leary says passengers and staff are regularly at risk of assaults on public transport.

He said: "What concerns me is a very recent incident on a train in Claremorris back in April, a train driver was assaulted and the answer from the company was that they take assaults on staff very seriously but stressed that they are extremely rare.

Now, if 20 assaults on staff in 17 months is rare, that is not my definition of rare.

- Digital Desk

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