Murder trial witness denies lying

A witness in the trial for murder of two Cork men has denied he is not telling the truth due to pressure from the family of one of the accused.

Thomas Morey was giving evidence at the Central Criminal Court in the trial of Cecil Lynch (aged 26) of St Declan’s Road, Gurranabraher and Jerry Ross (aged 27) of St Philomena’s Road, Gurranabraher who both deny murdering Mr Butler on October 7, 2002 at Gurranabraher Road.

Asked by prosecuting counsel Mr Patrick J McCarthy SC about why he had not given his address in open court he replied: “For my own protection.”

Mr McCarthy then asked him if he was not telling the truth due to “pressure from the Lynchs”, to which he replied “No”.

Earlier Mr McCarthy asked him about a statement taken down by gardaí during an interview on October 27, 2002.

In the statement, which Mr McCarthy read to the witness, Mr Morey had claimed he got into a car with Cecil Lynch. He said he did not see a gun and if he had he would have got out of the car straight away.

He said he knew that something was going to be done to Mr Butler to get even for a fight and he thought the accused had a stick and was going to beat Mr Butler up. Mr McCarthy asked Mr Morey: “You seriously can’t remember this? Anyone’s memory would be jogged by this.”

The accused said he could not.

Later in the statement Mr Morey said he was going out to help in the fight when he heard two bangs and “saw Rachel run onto the road roaring and screaming”.

He said he panicked and did not know what to do so he ran over to the car and got back in.

Mr Morey has claimed he cannot remember making this statement to gardaí and denied to Mr McCarthy that he had discussed his evidence with anyone.

The trial continued in legal argument today before Mr Justice Philip O’Sullivan and is due to continue tomorrow.


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