Mother accuses daughter's boyfriend of raping her

A 54-year-old woman who alleges she was raped by her daughter’s boyfriend has denied falsely making similar accusations about other individuals in the past.

The complainant, who has suffered with psychiatric and alcohol problems, told a Central Criminal Court jury that previous allegations she had made of abuse were true, and the trial was her chance to say how what had happened to her was wrong and that “no means no”.

The accused man has pleaded not guilty to raping the woman at an address in Co Mayo on November 6, 2005.

In response to repeated questioning from defence counsel, Mr Michael Liam O’Higgins SC, as to whether she had a history of making up malicious stories about people, the complainant said that her past allegations were the truth.

The woman agreed with Mr O’Higgins that she was admitted as an in-patient to a psychiatric hospital earlier in her life and that more recently she again came under the care of the psychiatric services.

The woman agreed with Mr O’Higgins that she had been hospitalised for binge drinking.

However, the woman denied she was binge drinking in the week prior to November 5 and stated that she made significant progress and had been getting on “very well” with an addiction counsellor.

The woman told Mr O’Higgins that she had a lot of problems with drink because of what had happened to her as a child.

The complainant, who was aged 49 at the time of the alleged assault, agreed with Mr Gerard Clarke SC (with Ms Melanie Greally BL), prosecuting, that on the evening of November 5 she had been to the pub with friends and family.

The woman agreed that she briefly met the accused man and her daughter at one pub and had two to three drinks over the course of the night before returning home to bed at 3am.

She told Mr Clarke that she awoke some time close to 5am to find the accused man, who had been dating her daughter and periodically stayed at the house, lying naked on top of her.

The woman told Mr Clarke that then man spoke to her by name, removed her underwear and raped her.

The woman said the man stopped the assault before the point of ejaculation before leaving her bedroom for a minute or two.

When he returned to the room for a second time, the woman said that she “roared” at him to leave and began screaming for her daughter.

The complainant told Mr Clarke that as he left the room the man turned to her and said “we’ll keep this our little secret”.

Late the following evening the woman agreed that there was a confrontation with the accused man, where the allegation of rape was put to him.

The woman told Mr Clarke that the man responded by repeatedly saying he could not remember and asked if he had hurt the woman if he had assaulted her.

The woman told Mr Clarke that she did not make a complainant to gardaí until December 2006, more than a year after the alleged rape, because she was “frightened” and did not want her parents to find out.

The trial continues before Mr Justice Barry White and a jury.


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