More than 13,000 ex-prisoners placed in employment, education or training in 15 years

More than 13,000 ex-prisoners placed in employment, education or training in 15 years

More than 13,000 prison offenders have been placed in employment, education or training over the last 15 years with the help of the Irish Association for the Social Integration of Offenders.

The organisation has released the figures as part of an annual report which will be published later today.

They are calling for local communities to play a part in the rehabilitation of offenders.

However, the association says that former prisoners often find it difficult to get a job and to re-integrate in their local communities.

The report shows that more than 21,000 offenders have engaged with them since the year 2000.

Almost two thirds of these have been placed in employment, education or training.

The group's CEO Paddy Richardson says new legislation should make it easier for reformed offenders to secure work.

He said: "People who are going for employment must declare, if asked, if they have a criminal record and that is part of the problem.

"And once they do that and say 'yes, I have a criminal record, but I have put that behind me', normally they are told 'well thank you very much, we'll be in touch' and that's the last of it.

"But the Spent Convictions Bill goes some way towards rectifying that and we welcome that with open arms and we are delighted the minister is putting it through this autumn."


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