Monthly employment rate now lowest since May 2008

Monthly employment rate now lowest since May 2008
File image.

Unemployment levels have dropped again.

The seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for April fell slightly to 5.9%, with just over 140,000 people still without work.

Unemployment levels among men are nearly 1% higher than they are for women.

The monthly unemployment rate has continued to fall month-on-month over the past year to 5.9% in April 2018, representing a total fall in the unemployment rate of 0.9 percentage points since April 2017 when unemployment stood at 6.8%. It is the lowest monthly unemployment rate since May 2008.

Update 1.30pm: Employment Affairs and Social Protection Minister, Regina Doherty, welcomed the figures. She said: “Today is the first time monthly unemployment has fallen to under 6% in 10 years. This is a significant milestone, considering unemployment was at 16% just six years ago."

- Digital Desk

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