Mixed news for Irish universities in latest world rankings

Mixed news for Irish universities in latest world rankings

The latest QS World University Rankings are a mixed bag for Irish institutions according to the President of DCU.

Trinity College remains Ireland's top-ranked university, despite falling seven places to 78th.

UCD (139th to 154th) and UCC (joint 230th to joint 233rd) also fell to while NUI Galway (280th to 271st) and DCU (366th to 353rd) were on the rise.

University of Limerick climbed from the 501-550 bracket to 471-480, while Maynooth went from the 601-650 to 551-600 bracket.

DCU president Brian MacCraith said that while the results are mixed for Irish institutions, they are still of a very high standard internationally.

"Overall, I think it's significant that all seven Irish universities are in the top 600 globally," he said.

"When you take into account there are close to 20,000 universities worldwide, that means all Irish universities are in the top 3% worldwide.

"I think that has to be borne in mind, in fact it's really quite remarkable that all Irish universities are doing well, given the funding circumstances in which they must operate."

Trinity Dean of Research, Professor John Boland said: "We are delighted that Trinity College Dublin continues to be recognised globally as Ireland’s premier university, competing at the highest international standards.

"At the heart of the university is its teaching and the high scores for subjects areas, and the overall recognition of our academic staff are a real testament of the quality of a Trinity education for our students.

"It is also particularly heartening that employers rate our graduates so highly for the jobs market and their employability both nationally and globally.

"Notwithstanding these combined achievements the cuts in funding and increased investments made by our global competition, continue to have a direct impact on the rankings.

"Trinity is battling against intense international competition, particularly from Asian universities and from certain European countries where governments are investing heavily in higher education.

"The continued reduction in government investment in Irish universities has impacted negatively on the international standing of our universities and our ability to compete in a global arena."

He added: "A world class university requires resourcing at internationally competitive levels and for Trinity to sustain its position and increase further worldwide requires sustained investment in the university sector."

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