Man with alleged links to Islamic terrorism appeals deportation from Ireland

Man with alleged links to Islamic terrorism appeals deportation from Ireland

An appeal brought by a man with alleged links to Islamic terrorism against his removal from the State will proceed before the Supreme Court at the end of the month.

The court had previously granted the man's lawyers permission to challenge an order of the High Court permitting his deportation on the grounds the case raised points of general public importance.

The man claims that if deported he is at risk of being tortured, and subjected to inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.

The appeal was briefly mentioned returned before Mr Justice Donal O'Donnell in the Supreme Court today who was told the appeal can proceed on May 31 next.

Michael Lynn SC said the appeal will be heard in a day.

The man's appeal is against a judgment by Mr Justice Richard Humphreys who dismissed his bid to overturn the decision of the Minister for Justice to deport the man.

Mr Justice Humphreys ruled the Minister's decision, that there were no substantial grounds to find that the man would be at real risk of ill treatment if deported to his home country, was lawful.

The Judge also refused to allow the man bring an appeal to the Court of Appeal and lifted a stay preventing him being removed from the State because no point of law of exception public importance arose.

The man, aged in his 50s and has been living in Ireland for several years, claims his rights under Article 3 of the European Convention would be breached if he is deported.

The man, who cannot be identified for legal reasons, denies being involved in terrorism claims he is at risk due to his political views.

A deportation order was issued after gardaí informed the Department of Justice the man's activities and associates are "of serious concern" and "contrary to the State's security".

Among its concerns, the State claims the man had been "raising money for jihadists" and that he was not only convicted of terrorism offences in France but also in his home country.

The court heard he was convicted and jailed in France for several years for terrorist offences.

He has also served a prison sentence in Ireland after he was convicted of attempting to travel using forged documents.


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