Man to be sentenced later for knife assault on ex-partner

A Dublin drug addict who crouched down pretending to be a child in his ex-partner’s porch so she would open the door to him will be sentenced later for assaulting her with a kitchen knife.

Martin Murray (aged 37) later told gardaí he had been fueled by drugs, alcohol and “jealousy” over Ms Lucille Webb’s new relationship with another man when he burst into her home.

Murray, of St Mary’s Place, Dorset Street Flats, pleaded guilty at Dublin Circuit Criminal Court to assaulting Ms Webb causing her harm at her Lusk home at Racecourse Commons on November 28, 2008.

He has 31 previous convictions dating from 1994 for burglary and similar offences.

Garda Donnacha Ryan told Ms Melanie Greally BL, prosecuting, that he and colleagues saw Murray shouting in a nearby field when they arrived on the scene after a distressed phone call from Ms Webb.

Gda Ryan revealed that Murray had called Ms Webb earlier looking for access to his two children but she took them instead to her sister’s home as she was concerned about Murray’s drug addiction.

She had returned home to get ready to meet her new boyfriend when Murray crouched down in her porch so she would open the door to him.

He burst through the door shouting that he could not bear to think of her with another man. He broke through a front window soon after Ms Webb had managed to lock him outside.

Gda Ryan said Ms Webb was on the phone to gardaií when Murray kicked down her bedroom door, dragged her onto the floor and began attacking her with a kitchen knife.

The garda told Ms Greally that the injured party managed to calm her ex-partner down and escape while he fetched bandages for the superficial cuts on her hands.

Ms Webb then waited at a neighbour’s house while Murray went into the field and got rid of the knife.

Gda Ryan agreed with Mr John Byrne BL, defending, that his client had appeared “hysterical” on a cocktail of drugs and alcohol at the scene but had made full admissions.

He further agreed that Murray does not pose a threat to Ms Webb as he has not seen her or his children since the 2008 incident.

Mr Byrne submitted to Judge Katherine Delahunt that his client did not offend between 1995 and 2008 while he was in a stable relationship with Ms Webb and that his recent relapse with heroin came after several family bereavements.

Mr Byrne further submitted that his client did not try to minimise his involvement at the scene.

Counsel asked the judge to consider his client’s early guilty plea and the “positive steps” he has since taken to address his drug addiction.

Judge Delahunt remanded Murray in custody on his request and adjourned sentencing pending a probation and welfare report.


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