Man found at Newry flat identified as protesters remember victims

Man found at Newry flat identified as protesters remember victims
Giselle Marimon-Herrera and her daughter Allison.

A 38-year-old man who was found dead in a flat in Newry along with a woman and a teenager has been named.

Police named him as him as Russell Steele, who was originally from Scotland.

The bodies of 37-year-old Giselle Marimon Herrera, from Colombia, and her daughter Allison, 15, were also found at the apartment in Newry, Co Down, this week in a murder-suicide which investigators described as unspeakably tragic.

Yesterday, the PSNI confirmed that Spanish-born Allison was strangled, and said there was a "strong possibility" that Giselle had also been strangled.

Detectives said today that Russell Steele, Giselle's partner who lived at the address, died by hanging.

Belfast Lord Mayor Deirdre Hargey said: "We are here in solidarity with their family at the loss of their lives and to say enough is enough."

PSNI officers have launched a murder investigation and are not looking for anybody else.

Police received post-mortem examination results yesterday.

Officers went to the flat in Glin Ree Court, close to the city centre, after a relative reported concerns that they had not been in contact with a family member for days.

Their bodies were discovered at about 11am on Thursday after police forced entry.

Hundreds of Women's Day demonstrators in Northern Ireland have remembered Giselle and Allison today, with two protesters holding a placard which read: "Their names are Giselle and Allison."

Two unnamed protestors hold up a placard remembering Allison Marimon-Herrera and her mother Giselle. Photo: Michael McHugh/PA.
Two unnamed protestors hold up a placard remembering Allison Marimon-Herrera and her mother Giselle. Photo: Michael McHugh/PA.

An organiser of today's march in Belfast said: "We will not be silent over violence against women.

Let's have a minute's noise instead of a minute's silence.

Detective Superintendent Jason Murphy said it was an "unspeakable tragedy".

Ms Marimon-Herrera moved from Colombia to Northern Ireland four years ago. She worked in the Newry area.

Her daughter Allison was born in Spain and has lived in Northern Ireland since 2017. She attended Newry High School.

Mr Murphy added: "I believe that Giselle and Allison were still alive in the early hours of Sunday morning but family members have not been able to contact them since."

PA & Digital Desk

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