Man accused of murder of Detective Garda Adrian Donohoe further remanded in custody

By Tom Tuite

A man accused of the murder of Detective Garda Adrian Donohoe in a shooting in 2013 has been further remanded in custody for another month.

Aaron Brady, 27, from New Road, Crossmaglen, Co Armagh is charged that he murdered a Garda, namely Adrian Donohoe at Lordship Credit Union, Belurglan, Co Louth on Jan. 25, 2013.

Adrian Donohoe

The officer, a married father-of-two, was killed while on duty.

Det Garda Donohoe had been on a cash escort with colleagues when he was fatally shot during a botched robbery in the car park of credit union.

Mr Brady was charged on March 4 and remanded in custody following an appearance before Dundalk District Court.

He faced his fourth hearing on Friday appearing at Cloverhill District Court.

He was further remanded in custody by Judge Victor Blake, pending the preparation of a book of evidence, to appear again on June 1 next.

Earlier a State solicitor told Judge Blake that the DPP has directed “trial on indictment”. This means the accused will face trial in the Central Criminal Court.

He had been arrested in Dublin on Feb. 25 and was detained for a week at Dundalk Garda station under the provisions of section 50 of the Criminal Justice Act 2007.

At his first hearing, Det Inspector Patrick Marry said when Mr Brady was charged with the murder, he replied: “I strongly deny any involvement in the murder of Detective Garda Adrian Donohoe.”

Bail can only be granted by the High Court in murder cases.


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