Man accused of kidnapping a six-year-old boy with Down's syndrome

Man accused of kidnapping a six-year-old boy with Down's syndrome

A man has been sent forward for trial accused of kidnapping a six-year-old boy with Down's syndrome who became separated from his family in Dublin city-centre.

David Ryan (aged 27) with an address at Foxdene Avenue, Clondalkin in Dublin, but who was described as being of no fixed abode, was originally charged with false imprisonment of the boy at Liffey Street on June 11 last.

The small child, who is unable to communicate, was allegedly found when a security guard noticed him alone on a street.

Mr Ryan had been refused bail at his first court appearance on June 12 and was remanded in custody.

Last month, the false imprisonment charge was withdrawn and replaced with abduction, contrary to Section 17 of the Non Fatal Offences Against the Person Act.

Today, the father-of-two appeared again at Cloverhill District Court where he was served with a book of evidence and the DPP consented to him being returned for trial on indictment.

Judge Victor Blake made an order sending him forward to the next term of the Dublin Circuit Criminal Court where he will appear on November 6.

At his district court bail hearing in June, Garda Elaine Holmes had said it was alleged Mr Ryan “took a child who was in a buggy, he pushed him across the road and took food from his hand and ate it”.

It was alleged Mr Ryan then searched the buggy and "left the child on the street".

Gda Holmes had also said the young boy requires “extensive care” adding that the child “has no speech” and "could not communicate with a security guard who took responsibility for him and became aware he was on his own”.

Gda Holmes had said Mr Ryan told her he has been homeless for a lengthy period and she had objected to bail citing the seriousness of the case.

Mr Ryan has been further remanded in custody pending his circuit court appearance.

The child abduction charge can, on conviction, carry a maximum seven-year sentence.

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