Man, 50s, dies in farming accident in Cork

Man, 50s, dies in farming accident in Cork

A man in his early 50s has died in a farming accident in Co Cork.

The incident, which involved a tractor, happened outside Glenville at around 5.30pm this evening.

Emergency services attended at the scene but the man was pronounced dead a short time later.

His body has since been removed to the mortuary at CUH where a post-mortem examination will be carried out.

The scene has been preserved and the Health and Safety Authority has been informed.

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