Limerick to Calais group appeals for clothes for Syrian refugees

Limerick to Calais group appeals for clothes for Syrian refugees

By David Raleigh

Dozens of tents, shoes, jackets, gloves and skinny jeans, have been donated to an organisation set up in Limerick to help refugees fleeing civil war in Syria into Europe.

The Limerick to Calais group was set up in the wake of the publication of the picture of the body of three-year-old Syrian boy, Aylan Kurdi, washed up on a beach after he drowned fleeing his war torn home country.

A depot which was set up last week in Bank Place, Limerick, has already seen huge volumes of clothes and medical supplies come through its doors.

Volunteer Colette Ahern, Dooradoyle, Limerick sorting donated clothes, shoes, bags, tents for the refugees in Calais. Pic: Liam Burke/Press 22.

Ahane woman, Nadine Buttery, who helped organise the depot, said they especially need clothes and supplies for boys and young men.

"We're focusing on young males who need clothes, and washing gear. They need all kinds of clothes, socks, shoes, t-shirts, jumpers, jackets, wash bags, wellies, razors, soap, plasters etc," Ms Buttery said.

"We also need sleeping bags and tents. Some of the crew from University of Limerick and the Scouts have donated tents and we have put those up on our Facebook page," she added.

Limerick to Calais group appeals for clothes for Syrian refugeesThe University of Limerick.

More than 3,500 people have pledged their help via the group's Facbook page Limerick to Calais, which Ms Buttery said was running in tandem with the Cork to Calais initiative.

"The whole situation with these refugees changed dramatically following the publication of the photograph of the little boy on the beach. Everyone wants to get involved, which is great."

"There are over 3,500 people on our Facebook page offering help in a thousand different ways. People want to help," Ms Buttery said.

Everything secured from the Limerick depot is being transferred to another depot in Shannon before it is sorted and flown out of Shannon Airport to refugees in Hungary and Greece.

Anyone wishing to donate items can drop them off at the former Cahill May Roberts building near The Granary, Limerick City.


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