Lidl commits to paying €11.50 per hour 'living wage', the first large retailer to do so

Lidl commits to paying €11.50 per hour 'living wage', the first large retailer to do so

Lidl is to become the first big employer here to commit to paying the "living wage" of €11.50 an hour from November 1.

The discount retailer - which has more than 140 stores in Ireland with almost 4,000 staff - said the move would affect 20% of its staff currently earning below this rate.

All other staff currently earn more than €11.50 an hour.

The living wage technical group devised the figure as the amount needed for an acceptable standard of living.

Minister for Employment and Business Ged Nash said Lidl's move was a significant milestone.

He said: "This is the first major retailer to commit to paying what's described as a living wage. It's a significant milestone."

Update 11am: Minister Nash said he expected other companies to follow Lidl's suit in bringing in the 'living wage'.

He said: "This will create a momentum behind the campaign and I would expect a significant number of other employers to start taking this initiative themselves."


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