LÉ James Joyce rescues 265 migrants

LÉ James Joyce rescues 265 migrants

The Irish naval vessel, the LÉ James Joyce, has rescued 265 migrants in the Mediterranean.

It followed a request from the Italian Maritime Rescue Co-Ordination Centre.

They were rescued from two rubber vessels north of Tripoli.

But during the operation, five bodies were recovered - including one heavily pregnant woman.

They are now being transferred to an Italian navy ship, which will bring them to port.

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