Latest: We simply don't know about the state of our pipes, says Irish Water

Latest: We simply don't know about the state of our pipes, says Irish Water

Update - 9.25am: Irish Water admits it is unclear about the state of its pipes and says there are not enough spare parts in case of emergency.

The utility company has just published a report into a mass supply failure in the North East this summer.

It found that it did not act fast enough to fix the burst at the Staleen treatment plant which left nearly 100,000 homes and businesses without water for almost a week.

Jerry Grant, Irish Water's Managing Director, said: "We simply don't know the details of all our assets in the ground, we don't know their condition and we don't have automatically spare parts available on the inventory around the place.

"There is no question that we have 300 bursts every month in our network, and all of those bursts affect communities and affect businesses."

Earlier: Irish Water has been forced to admit it took too long to communicate the severity of the Drogheda outage this summer.

Almost 100,000 homes were without water for almost a week in the Louth/Meath area as a result of a major pipe burst at the Staleen treatment plant.

Last July householders across Louth and Meath were forced to queue up to fill water bottles after the main supplying the region burst.

The pipe had ruptured the previous summer, but this time it took almost seven days to fully restore supplies to the thousands of people affected.

Latest: We simply don't know about the state of our pipes, says Irish Water

Irish Water has now released the findings of a review into how it handled the crisis.

It has found the utility should have escalated the matter within the first 24 hours so that it could better inform those affected, but the report stresses this would not have sped up the repair works.

However, the investigation does also note a failure to resolve access rights to the land involved in 2016 delayed the repair works, and that revelation is unlikely to go down well with those who were affected.

Irish Water has now updated its protocols for incidents like these in the hopes a similar situation will not happen again.


More in this Section

Gardaí seize almost €1.5m of cocaine in DroghedaGardaí seize almost €1.5m of cocaine in Drogheda

President Higgins to attend special screening of climate change film at conference in CorkPresident Higgins to attend special screening of climate change film at conference in Cork

Woman stored bag which contained €59k of drugsWoman stored bag which contained €59k of drugs

Woman stole over €40k from smartphone firm to repay other theftsWoman stole over €40k from smartphone firm to repay other thefts


Lifestyle

The Cosmetify Index reveals the cosmetics companies that are generating the most buzz online – and Dubai-based Huda Kattan has the top spot.Huda Beauty tops the 10 ‘most popular’ beauty brands this year

Read the script of Kya deLongchamps’ kitchen-sink drama to set the scene to make an informed choice when selecting this home essentialTake the plunge: Read this checklist before you splash out on your new kitchen sink

SOMETIMES, the journey is more important than the destination. And sometimes, we just want to sit at home eating a bag of jelly beans, while thinking about more jelly beans. Life is only as significant or special as we make it.GameTech: Death Stranding is a divisive, beautiful journey packaged in a cool world

Former Oasis drummer Tony McCarroll tells Richard Purden about the mad times when five Manc-Irish lads became one of the biggest rock bands in the worldNot looking back in anger: Former Oasis drummer looks back at the mad times of one of the biggest rock bands in the world

More From The Irish Examiner