Latest: Shane Ross confirms FAI report will be published this week

Latest: Shane Ross confirms FAI report will be published this week

Latest: Sports Minister Shane Ross says he expects to receive Sport Ireland's report on the Football Association of Ireland and governance concerns later this week.

The Independent Alliance minister also confirmed that the FAI is not compliant with new government guidelines on terms for board members and will not be until 2021.

His comments come ahead of the Oireachtas Sports Committee quizzing Sport Ireland tomorrow and discussing concerns around the FAI.

This includes the emergence of a €100,000 bridging loan given to the association by its former CEO John Delaney in 2017.

The FAI also announced last weekend that it has commissioned external group, Mazers, to conduct a review following concerns triggered by recent media reports.

Mr Ross told the Dáil this afternoon that he will get the Sport Ireland report this week and publish it towards the end of the week.

Separately, he addressed questions around terms for FAO board members, saying they are not fully in line with new government guidelines. And they will not be until 2021, when bodies in receipt of State funding have to change board terms.

"I would prefer if they were compliant now," said Mr Ross.

The move by the FAI to change its board term limits came after contact was made by the Department of Sport with the association earlier this year, Mr Ross also told the Dáil.

Earlier (1:58pm): Sport Ireland: FAI has not sufficiently explained Delaney's €100,000 loan

Sport Ireland says the FAI has not sufficiently explained a €100,000 loan given to the organisation by former CEO John Delaney.

Latest: Shane Ross confirms FAI report will be published this week

The governance body, which partly funds the FAI, says it was not made aware of the loan until media reports in the last few weeks.

It recently emerged John Delaney loaned the FAI €100,000 to address what the organisation said were cash flow problems.

Sport Ireland says it was never made aware of the loan despite such notification being in the terms and conditions of grant approval - that is, that any deterioration in the financial situation is flagged.

The head of Sport Ireland, John Treacy, is due at an Oireachtas Committee tomorrow. These claims are from his opening statement.

He says they have sought an explanation from football's governing body.

However, Mr Treacy says the reply "did not sufficiently explain the circumstances of this loan and its repayment, nor fully address the matter of compliance with Sport Ireland’s terms and conditions of grant approval".

Sport Ireland gives the FAI more than €3m a year in funding.

The statements note that three separate audit firms in the past have assured the organisation that the money is accounted for and being used properly.

Sport Ireland has no role in funding the professional side of the FAI, which would include the salary of the CEO.

Digital Desk

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