Latest: ISPCA calls for animal welfare course to be taught in primary schools

Latest: ISPCA calls for animal welfare course to be taught in primary schools

Update 1.49pm: The ISPCA has today called for an animal welfare to be taught to primary school children to prevent cruelty and neglect.

The ISCPA's annual report shows 21 cases were brought to court last year - the highest ever number.

Meanwhile, over 16,000 calls were made to the National Animal Cruelty Helpline.

CEO of the ISPCA, Dr Andrew Kelly, says children need to learn how to look after animals at a young age.

"Education is obviously absolutely crucial, and we've been calling for an animal welfare module to be taught included in the national school curriculum, specifically looking at responsible animal ownership so that children understand what the needs of animals are," he said.

Latest: ISPCA calls for animal welfare course to be taught in primary schools

Earlier: Nine ISPCA inspectors 'can really only cover 17 counties'

The ISPCA received almost 16,000 calls last year in relation to animal cruelty, it has revealed.

That led to over 3,000 investigations, and the seizure or surrender of over 1,200 animals in 2017.

The ISPCA's annual report states that a record 21 cases were successfully brought to court last year.

However, the organisation said that it needs more Government funding as its inspectors are over-stretched.

"The ISPCA only has nine inspectors to cover the whole of the country, and currently we can really only cover 17 counties," said Dr Andrew Kelly, CEO of the ISPCA.

"It costs over €50,000 a year to keep an inspector on the road."

- Digital desk

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