Latest: Half a million euro plan to lower sea wall in Clontarf ludicrous, says Boxer Moran

Latest: Half a million euro plan to lower sea wall in Clontarf ludicrous, says Boxer Moran
Minister Moran has described the decision as ludicrous

Update: 11.55am: The Minister of State with responsibility for the OPW Kevin ‘Boxer’ Moran has warned Dublin City Councillors they will bear the consequences if they move forward with their plan to lower the partially built sea wall in Clontarf.

Councillors voted last night to spend half a million euro to reduce the height of the barrier after local residents complained it blocked views of Dublin Bay.

However, the city manager believes the reduced height means it will not meet national flood protection standards.

Minister Moran described the decision as ludicrous.

He said: "Everything the OPW build is taking climate change into account and when I hear someone saying they want to lower a wall by a couple of millimetres so people can see into the sea - that is absolutely ludicrous."

File image.
File image.

Earlier: Dublin city councillors vote to spend half a million euro lowering Clontarf sea wall

Dublin city councillors have voted to spend half a million euro on lowering the partially built sea wall in Clontarf.

That is despite the city manager warning it will not meet national flood protection standards.

The voted carried 34 to 21 in favour of reducing the height and resurfacing the barrier, after locals mounted a massive campaign complaining it blocked their views of the sea.

Labour's Rebecca Moynihan said it was bizarre and irresponsible to reduce the wall for the benefits of drivers who should be looking at the road.

Green Party representative Ciaran Cuffe, who voted against lowering the wall, says colleagues have missed the bigger picture.

He said: "The City Council put in a new sea wall to protect parts of Clontarf from sea surges and flooding.

"That is going to happen and we tried to put in works that will prepare the area."

- Digital Desk

More on this topic

Vulnerability of Venice exposed by devastating series of floodsVulnerability of Venice exposed by devastating series of floods

Venice hit by third exceptional tide in less than a weekVenice hit by third exceptional tide in less than a week

Councillors hit out at OPW mapping system which has house in flood risk area despite it being 100ft above riverCouncillors hit out at OPW mapping system which has house in flood risk area despite it being 100ft above river

Designs ‘prove flood plan not a walls scheme’Designs ‘prove flood plan not a walls scheme’


More in this Section

DUP urges action to fill abortion ‘vacuum’DUP urges action to fill abortion ‘vacuum’

Body found in burning car in DublinBody found in burning car in Dublin

Taoiseach backs priest’s anti-violence stance over Kevin Lunney attackTaoiseach backs priest’s anti-violence stance over Kevin Lunney attack

Water is restored to Cork homes after burst main causes flood damageWater is restored to Cork homes after burst main causes flood damage


Lifestyle

‘Children of the Troubles’ recounts the largely untold story of the lost boys and girls of Northern Ireland, and those who died south of the border, in Britain and as far afield as West Germany, writes Dan Buckley.Children of the Troubles: Loss of lives that had barely begun

With Christmas Day six weeks away tomorrow, preparations are under way in earnest, writes Gráinne McGuinness.Making Cents: Bargains available on Black Friday but buyer beware!

From farming practices in Europe to forest clearances in the Amazon, Liz Bonnin’s new show seeks solutions to some of the damage done by the world’s appetite for meat, writes Gemma Dunn.New show seeks solutions to some of the damage done by the world’s appetite for meat

Louis Mulcahy reads in Cork this weekend for the Winter Warmer fest, writes Colette Sheridan.Wheel turns from pottery to poetry

More From The Irish Examiner