Latest census shows more than two million in work in Ireland

Latest census shows more than two million in work in Ireland

Latest figures show more than two million people were in the workforce last year- with the majority of these employed in the services sector. This represented an increase of 3.2% on the 2011 figure.

The figures come from Part 2 of the Census 2016 Summary Results, published today by the CSO.

Deirdre Cullen, Senior Statistician, explained: “This report focuses on the socio-economic aspects of the census such as employment, occupation and education, as well as health, disability and caring.”

There were 293,830 non-Irish nationals at work, an increase of 9.6% since April 2011.

According to the census, there has been an increase in men choosing to look after the home or family.

Among the cities, Waterford had the highest unemployment rate at 18.8%, while Longford had the highest rate (30.6%) of the large towns. There were 79 unemployment blackspots - eight of the top 10 were in Limerick.

At the time the survey was carried out almost six in every ten people said that they had very good health - while 13.5% of the population said they had a disability.

There were 427,128 students aged 15 and over in April 2016, an increase of 4.5% on the 2011 figure.

To view Census 2016 Summary Results - Part 2, visit the CSO website.


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