Labour's new Bill to close gender pay gap is 'a carrot not a big stick'

Labour's new Bill to close gender pay gap is 'a carrot not a big stick'

Labour's new Bill to close the gender pay gap will apparently 'take a carrot and not a stick approach'.

The Government has decided to support the Bill through the second stage in the Seanad today.

It asks big employers to publish pay rates for male and female colleagues for comparison reasons.

Labour Senator Ivana Bacik says the new law is not designed to punish people.

"It's a facilitative approach.

"It's a carrot not a big stick, because it would enable employers to see whether a gender pay gap exists, and then to enable the Human Rights and Equality Commission to work with employers to tackle that where it does exist," she said.

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