Just 9% of Irish consumers consider carbon footprint when buying food

Just 9% of Irish consumers consider carbon footprint when buying food

As few as one in ten Irish consumers consider their carbon footprint when buying food.

A new survey by Sustainable Dairy in Europe reveals that 82% of us believe that what we eat has a direct effect on preserving the planet.

Eight out of ten of those surveyed believe that to preserve the planet, we need to change how we consume and produce food.

However, just 9% of us put this into practice when filling our shopping trolleys.

The survey also shows that 59% of Irish consumers believe the dairy sector can help them eat more sustainably.

Despite this, 75% state they are not aware of the range of measures and initiatives that Irish dairy farmers use to enhance sustainability on their farms.

41% consider that the dairy sector has a negative impact on climate change.

The survey was conducted as part of a three-year campaign, “Sustainable Dairy in Europe – safeguarding our resources”.

The research involved 2,000 consumers in Ireland as well as 2,000 consumers in Belgium, Denmark, France, and the Netherlands with the aim to gain an understanding of consumers’ perceptions of sustainability, climate change and the challenges they pose in relation to the dairy sector.

Commenting on the results, Zoe Kavanagh, Chief Executive of the National Dairy Council said: “The ‘Sustainable Dairy in Europe’ project is really essential for the dairy sector.

"We have a strategic action plan in place to support farmers to continue to produce dairy products that are important in the daily diet, but to also produce dairy in a more sustainable way using new farming practices that reduce their impact on the environment.

We are continuing to educate the sector on the latest innovations and science-based advice where they can take simple and effective measures across their farms.

"These include adapting use from natural resources, such as substituting clover for chemical fertilizer, reducing losses from slurry, and incorporating forestry and hedgerows on farms to name but a few.

“Our rural communities rely on agriculture and the food industry for their livelihood and are proactively and speedily working to adapt their methods of farming. They are moving to more sustainable practices that lower their carbon footprint whilst protecting the future for family farming generations,” she said.

More on this topic

Non-residential farm for sale at Ballineen, West CorkNon-residential farm for sale at Ballineen, West Cork

Pig farmers look for at least €1.90Pig farmers look for at least €1.90

60 acres inside Limerick’s future ring road for auction60 acres inside Limerick’s future ring road for auction

Farm beside motorway guide priced at €595,000Farm beside motorway guide priced at €595,000


More in this Section

Dublin GAA club claims its future 'is in jeopardy' after joyriders destroy pitchesDublin GAA club claims its future 'is in jeopardy' after joyriders destroy pitches

Households accounted for one-fifth of greenhouse gases but paid over half of all environmental taxesHouseholds accounted for one-fifth of greenhouse gases but paid over half of all environmental taxes

'It's up to the House of Commons now' - Taoiseach raises Brexit pressure on UK'It's up to the House of Commons now' - Taoiseach raises Brexit pressure on UK

Appeal court allows receiver to repossess Capel Street building which housed former theatre and showroomAppeal court allows receiver to repossess Capel Street building which housed former theatre and showroom


Lifestyle

Mountaintop monasteries, vicious-looking vultures, and a seriously impressive cable car.As Ryanair launches flights to Armenia, here’s why it deserves to be your next holiday destination

Jools Holland and his Rhythm & Blues Orchestra played a storming gig at Cork Opera House, writes Des O'Driscoll Live Music Review: Jools Holland and his Rhythm & Blues Orchestra

Concerns about people’s ability to access their own money have been growing – here’s what the debate is all about.Are we actually going to end up as a cashless society?

Esther N McCarthy mixes it up with spins on kitchen classics, Munster-based design news plus an absolute diamond of a poufMade in Munster: Wish list of the best products in the province

More From The Irish Examiner