Just 7% of Irish parents believe their child is overweight

Just 7% of Irish parents believe their child is overweight

A new survey shows only 7% of Irish parents believe their child is overweight.

That is according to the latest figures from the Pfizer Health Index published today which also shows 86% of Irish people ranked health as a top priority investment for the future.

The report questioned parents about their children's health including awareness of their weight, frequency of exercise and sleep time.

It also found only 47% of parents reported knowing their child's weight.

Sheena Horgan is the author of ‘Candy Coated Marketing’.

She has this advice for parents: It is the being able to say no, it is looking at portion size, its looking at screen time and sedentary lifestyles.

“There is a multi faceted approach that is required to address these issues.

“It is hard for parents to say no, especially when we live in such a media saturated environment, there is an awful lot of advertising, promotions and sponsorship out there.”


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