Judge refuses to grant stay on orders preventing work on Moore St buildings

Judge refuses to grant stay on orders preventing work on Moore St buildings

A judge has refused to grant a stay on his orders preventing work on buildings in Dublin's Moore Street area.

The 1916 Rising battlefield site was last month declared a national monument - quashing plans for a commemorative centre at the site.

Mr Justice Max Barrett refused a stay on the order in the High Court earlier and also awarded full costs of the case against the State.

However the Department of Arts and Heritage was granted access to some of the buildings to carry out essential repair works.

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