Judge orders arrest for man accused of trespassing in U2 drummer's home

Judge orders arrest for man accused of trespassing in U2 drummer's home
Larry Mullen.

A judge has ordered the arrest of a Dublin man accused of trespassing at the home of U2 drummer Larry Mullen.

Gerard O'Neill, aged 31, of Orchid House, James Street, Dublin 8, did not show up for a court hearing today when he was due to face extra charges.

He has already been charged with trespassing on the curtilage of a building at Claremont Lodge, Claremont Road, Howth in such a manner as to cause fear in another person, on October 19 last.

The alleged offence is contrary to Section 13 of the Criminal Justice (Public Order) Act.

The 31-year-old faces another connected charge under section nine of the Firearms and Offensive Weapons Act for possessing a golf club on the same date with intent to unlawfully cause injury or to intimidate two gardai in the course of their duty.

Mr O’Neill had been granted bail at an earlier stage in the proceedings while gardai sought directions from the DPP.

He was due to appear again at Dublin District Court, however, when the case was called he was not present and there was no explanation available for his absence.

Prosecuting Garda Aishling O'Neill told Judge Michael Walsh the matter was before the court for “further charges and DPP directions” but there was no sign of the defendant.

Judge Walsh agreed to her request to issue a bench warrant for Mr O'Neill to be arrested and brought before the court.

Solicitor Declan Fahy, defending, said he could not oppose that.

Mr O'Neill had been present for three earlier hearings but has not yet entered a plea.

In November an order had been made for disclosure of prosecution evidence to the defence and Mr O'Neill had consented to his case being adjourned until today.

It has not yet been stated in the proceedings whether his trial will be dealt with at district court level or instead be sent forward to the circuit court which, on conviction, has wider sentencing powers.


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