Judge discharges foreman of jury in Sean FitzPatrick trial

Judge discharges foreman of jury in Sean FitzPatrick trial

The foreman of the jury in the trial of former Anglo Irish Bank Chairman Sean FitzPatrick has been discharged for personal reasons.

Mr FitzPatrick from Greystones, Co Wicklow denies 27 charges relating to the disclosure of loans from Irish Nationwide Building Society between 2002 and 2007.

Judge Mary Ellen Ring asked the remaining 11 jurors to return to court again on June 2.

It is the fourth time they have been sent away since they were sworn in five weeks ago. No evidence has been heard.

Judge Ring told them today that the case is still in legal argument, but there is what appears to be light at the end of the tunnel - which she hopes is not the light of an oncoming train.

She discharged the foreman of the jury who is experiencing work difficulties and asked the 11 remaining to return on June 2, when she believes all will be done and dusted.

Another juror, who is a jobseeker, complained that he is struggling to find the bus fare to come to court and that the case is interfering with his ability to find work.

The judge said he had raised a legitimate concern about jurors' costs, but it was out of her hands and she told him that if he got a job the court would not stand in his way.


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