Joyce enthusiasts celebrate Bloomsday at Glasnevin

James Joyce enthusiasts have arrived at Glasnevin Cemetery in full costume to commemorate Bloomsday.

The event included a costumed performance by the “Joyceanstagers” of chapter six, Hades, from Ulysses, which is set in the cemetery.

It was followed by a special Joycean-themed tour of the cemetery.

Bloomsday enthusiasts arrived in hired carriages and costume.

CEO of Glasnevin Trust Aoife Watters said: “Glasnevin Cemetery is very proud to have a special connection with James Joyce and Bloomsday.

“Several of the characters from the book Ulysses found their final resting place here, including Paddy Dignam, Michael Cusack (the citizen) and even Joyce’s own father John Stanislaus.

“It’s wonderful to be able to host this event here today, honouring the great James Joyce, and the masterpiece that is Ulysses.”

Several characters from Ulysses ended up in Glasnevin Cemetery (Brian Lawless/PA)
Several characters from Ulysses ended up in Glasnevin Cemetery (Brian Lawless/PA)

Thousands of people come to Ireland for Bloomsday and it has expanded into a week-long event.

Glasnevin Cemetery holds a special place for Joyce devotees.

In the Hades chapter, Leopold Bloom accompanied Simon, Stephen’s father to Paddy Dignam’s funeral and decided from then on to reject morbid thoughts and to embrace “warm full-blooded life”.

A fully costumed performance of this chapter was performed by the “Joycestagers” on Sunday.

The enactment was followed by a specialised tour, led by Paddy Gleeson.

It took in historic graves on the way, including the writer’s father John Stanislaus Joyce, along with the final resting places of a multitude of people from the novel, Ulysses, and from James Joyce’s life.

The Glasnevin Cemetery Cafe also provided a Bloomsday-themed menu.

Ulysses follows the life and thoughts of Bloom, the central character and the novel, from 8am on June 16, 1904, through to the early hours of the following morning.

John Shevlin is a Joyce lookalike.

He said: “Bloomsday is a long day but a wonderful day.”

- Press Association

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