Jobs at risk in cable manufacturing company

More than 100 workers at B3 cables in Longford Town will find out today whether a buyer has been found for the company.

Management at the firm, which manufactures copper and fibre optic cables, announced last week that it had gone into receivership.

Attempts have been underway to find a buyer for the cable manufacturer, which is one of Longford Town's major employers.

However it is understood the attempts have been unsuccessful to date and Alan Flanagan of Deloitte, the appointed receiver, will brief unions on the future later.

A total of 106 people are employed at the firm, which has been in Longford since 1982.

The company specialises in the manufacture of copper and optical fibre cable and also has bases in the UK, Spain, Portugal and China.


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