Ireland-US relationship needs to be sorted, Martin says of Trump visit confusion

The lack of an American ambassador to Ireland is not helping the relationship between the two countries.

That is according to Fianna Fail leader Micheál Martin, who has been reacting to the news that Donald Trump's trip to Ireland has been cancelled.

The US President was due to spend some time here as part of a short trip to Europe for World War I centenary commemorations.

The government now says that will not go ahead because the itinerary is too tight - but the White House say no final decision on the Irish trip has been made.

Fianna Fail's Micheál Martin thinks the channels of communication need to be improved.

"This has been an extraordinary series where government haven't been alerted that the visit is on in the first instance - it came out of the blue - and then in a similar manner it emerges that the visit is off," said Mr Martin.

I don't know whether channels are working between the government here and the government in the US. But I think that there is a need to get this relationship sorted.

A number of protests were planned for the visit of Donald Trump.

Activist groups and some politicians said they would boycott the trip.

People Before Profit's Richard Boyd Barrett was one of them: "Well that's typical of Donald Trump, isn't it?

"You never know what the truth is, what his position is about anything from one day to the next.

"But that's why I will certainly be glad if the visit is cancelled as quickly as it was announced because we don't need Donald Trump here and I don't think most people want him here."

Digital Desk


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