Ireland set for temperatures up to 27C while Europe prepares for 'exceptional heatwave'

Ireland set for temperatures up to 27C while Europe prepares for 'exceptional heatwave'

Temperatures in Ireland could rise to the high 20s later in the week.

Meanwhile, in Continental Europe, there is the possibility of an 'exceptional heatwave' in the coming days.

Authorities around Paris have issued an orange alert for intense heat, the second-highest level on its scale, with the heat wave expected to last all week with temperatures of up to 40C.

The peak is expected on Thursday, with similar heat is expected in Belgium, Switzerland and Germany.

But climatologist Professor John Sweeney says it's unlikely we will experience such extremes.

"Met Éireann are saying we'll get temperatures up to 27C on Thursday but we won't get, one suspects, the kind of prolonged, very hot temperatures that our near neighbours are getting," said Mr Sweeney.

"Maybe that's no harm because we know that even with temperatures in the high 20s, we notice a mortality peak, even here in Ireland on a smaller scale."

Digital Desk & PA

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