Ireland and South Africa sign film-making deal at Cannes

Ireland and South Africa sign film-making deal at Cannes

Ireland and South Africa have signed a deal at the famous Cannes Film Festival to forge closer links with each other within the film-making industry.

Arts Minister Jimmy Deenihan said the co-production treaty would allow film-makers in both countries to access national funding, tax breaks and other subsidies.

“Co-production agreements matter because they open up new territories for film-makers to explore and exploit,” he said.

“This agreement aims to allow Irish film-makers and production companies to forge closer links with their South African counterparts, for the benefit of both parties.”

Mr Deenihan’s South African counterpart Paul Mashatile, said the partnership will bring new opportunities for talent in both countries.

“South African film-makers have earned a place on the international stage, through relationships like this one, we will continue to support them and our future story tellers,” he said.

Several Irish and South African producers attended the signing of the treaty at the Cannes International Film Festival.

There have already been a number of Irish South African co-productions including John Boorman’s 'Country of My Skull', starring Juliette Binoche and Samuel L Jackson.

Others include Gilles McKinnon’s 'Tara Road', which starred Andie McDowell, and 'The Good Man'.


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