Hunt begins for young designers to take part in Junk Kouture 2016

Hunt begins for young designers to take part in Junk Kouture 2016

The hunt is on for creative teens to enter this year’s fashion design competition using only recycled materials or junk.

Louis Walsh has officially launched the call out for entries to this year’s Junk Kouture competition 2016 for secondary school students.

Last year’s finalist was crowned in a ceremony at the 3Arena in Dublin.

Hunt begins for young designers to take part in Junk Kouture 2016

The northern regional winner, Elle O’Hagan - who’s 16 and from Buncrana in Co Donegal – says her piece was inspired by fire hoses.

“It is called ‘Combustion’ and it is made out of fire hoses and garden hoses," Ms O' Hagan said.

“The garden hoses are all weaved together to make a top and there is brass pieces on the skirt at the bottom kinda shaped like flames.

“My daddy was a fireman so he went round and organized to get old fire hoses and we cut them up into strips and glued them together into petals.”


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