Homelessness charity sees influx of students and prisoners sleeping on streets as services are cut

Homelessness charity sees influx of students and prisoners sleeping on streets as services are cut

A homelessness charity has said that a number of evicted students and prisoners who have been released temporarily over Covid-19 fears are sleeping on the streets.

The CEO of Inner City Helping Homeless CEO, Anthony Flynn, slammed the provisions in place for the homeless during the coronavirus pandemic.

Mr Flynn said: "The number of people sleeping out nightly has not reduced despite increased bed capacity put in place by the DRHE."

He said that there were a number of key factors causing an influx of people into the homeless system, which included prisoners from the Irish Prison Service given a temporary release and students evicted from student accommodation.

He added that these people were becoming homeless for the first time.

Mr Flynn said: "There are still up to 90 people per night who are sleeping rough, and with the reduction in day services right through the system people cannot access showering facilities, nor are they able to wash clothes never mind wash their hands as per HSE guidelines.

"Many services have been reduced because of the threat of Covid-19, which means those who are most vulnerable cannot simply wash their hands. With many cafes, shops, bars or libraries not open simple toilet facilities are unavailable.

"More needs to be done to ensure that proper access to washing and sanitation is widely available for all those require it. Outdoor showers, sanitation devices need to be implemented without delay as it could save lives.”

    Useful information
  • The HSE have developed an information pack on how to protect yourself and others from coronavirus. Read it here
  • Anyone with symptoms of coronavirus who has been in close contact with a confirmed case in the last 14 days should isolate themselves from other people - this means going into a different, well-ventilated room alone, with a phone; phone their GP, or emergency department;
  • GPs Out of Hours services are not in a position to order testing for patients with normal cold and flu-like symptoms. HSELive is an information line and similarly not in a position to order testing for members of the public. The public is asked to reserve 112/999 for medical emergencies at all times.
  • ALONE has launched a national support line and additional supports for older people who have concerns or are facing difficulties relating to the outbreak of COVID-19 (Coronavirus) in Ireland. The support line will be open seven days a week, 8am-8pm, by calling 0818 222 024

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