Groups accuse Ireland of failing sex trafficking victims

Groups accuse Ireland of failing sex trafficking victims

Human rights groups are accusing Ireland of failing the victims of sex trafficking.

A new report to be presented to the European Commission claims that sexual exploitation is behind more than two-thirds of human trafficking to this country.

The industry here is worth around €150m a year to organised crime and there are fears that victims are not being identified fast enough.

The latest study also calls for the appointment of an Independent Rapporteur, who would ensure the Irish Government is up to date with the latest European regulations.

Denise Charlton, an anti-trafficking consultant with the Immigrant Council of Ireland who helped write the report, explains why it takes so long to find victims.

Ms Charlton said: "The procedure that we have means that victims must co-operate with the police in order to be identified as a victim.

"And that is problematic, because the intention was just to give a safe period for those who have been exploited to regain control of their life.

"And then, if they were able, they would be a witness to the police."


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