Govt extends Hep C treatment programme

Govt extends Hep C treatment programme

The Government is extending the national Hepatitis C treatment programme.

The Minister for Health Simon Harris says it will mean that all "State-infected" people will have begun treatment by the end of next year.

The new drugs programme can be used to treat more than 90% of those with Hepatitis C.

It is being rolled out using €30m under the HSE's national service plan.

Minister Harris said: "It builds on the significant progress made in 2015 under the programme. In particular, the HSE is confident that all State-infected people will have commenced treatment by the end of next year, following through on the Government decision of last year.

"The new direct-acting anti-viral drugs that the programme covers give over 90% of those treated the chance to be cured of this serious illness which can persist for decades before manifesting itself.

"Expanding the programme will enable more people to get that chance at a cure, improving their lives immeasurably, while also helping free up scarce resources in our hospitals."


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