Government urged to appeal court ruling that ‘Hooded Men’ did not suffer torture

The Irish Government is being called on to appeal against a European court decision that found the so-called Hooded Men did not suffer torture.

Speaking before putting a motion to the Seanad, Sinn Fein senator Niall O Donnghaile said he wanted the Government to “see the case through” and lodge an appeal against the decision, made by the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) in March.

The Hooded Men were 14 Catholics interned – detained indefinitely without trial – in 1971 who said they were subjected to a number of torture methods.

Sinn Fein senator Niall O Donnghaile (left) with Liam Shannon, one of the so-called Hooded Men (Brian Lawless/PA)

These included five techniques – hooding, stress positions, white noise, sleep deprivation and deprivation of food and water – along with beatings and death threats.

The men were hooded and flown by helicopter to a secret location, later revealed to be a British Army camp at Ballykelly, outside Derry.

Mr O Donnghaile said: “It’s about vindication for these men and what they went through but also the people who continue to suffer torture around the world.”

One of the Hooded Men, Liam Shannon, 70, who was at Leinster House on Wednesday to see the motion put forward, said the decision was “massively” important to the men.

He said: “We’ve been going at this for 47 and a half years, trying to get justice, just to get the truth.

“We are going to continue, it doesn’t matter how it goes, we are going to continue and we will get the truth in the end.”

He added: “We can only hope that the Irish Government will fulfil its obligation and continue what they started and finish this off.”

The ECHR dismissed Ireland’s request to find the men suffered torture by six votes to one and said there was “no justification” for revising a 1978 ruling.

The court said new evidence had not demonstrated the existence of facts that were not known to the court at the time or which could have had a decisive influence on the original judgment.

The Irish Government first took a human rights case against Britain over the alleged torture in 1971.

The European Commission of Human Rights ruled that the mistreatment of the men was torture, but in 1978 the European Court of Human Rights held that the men suffered inhumane and degrading treatment that was not torture.

- Press Association


Related Articles

Travelling salesman jailed for raping employee

Judge places threat of imprisonment on mother over her daughters' absence from school

Authentic Food Group firm employing 169 in Dundalk is to close

Woman running massage parlours thought 'manual relief' was legal, court hears

More in this Section

Gardaí appeal for witnesses to accident that left teenager seriously injured

Children who sexually abuse need more help, says Children's Ombudsman

Counterfeiting in Northern Ireland ‘has grown due to internet’

Newbridge Gardaí ask for help to find missing teenager


Breaking Stories

As Karlie Kloss marries Joshua Kushner, here are 8 of her biggest fashion moments

This clever new app can help new parents decide if their baby needs to see a doctor

‘Acne won’t stop me living my life’ – Millie Mackintosh on how she got her skin under control

'Jesus, did I paint them?’; Robert Ballagh reacts to the nude portraits to him and his wife

More From The Irish Examiner