Government is 'strangling parliament' with Seanad abolition - Martin

Government is 'strangling parliament' with Seanad abolition - Martin

Fianna Fáil leader Micheál Martin has dismissed the government's estimated costs of running the Seanad.

It comes after Minister Richard Bruton, who is fronting the campaign for Seanad Abolition for Fine Gael, published a breakdown of the €20m cost.

Bruton said the yearly saving would pay the wages of 350 extra primary school teachers.

Micheál Martin, however, said political reform is needed, and not the scrapping of the upper house.

"It's s a system where the executive- that is essentially , the government - strangles the parliament: parliament id not independent of the executive.

All of the political parties before the last general election signed up to create a more independent parliament than we currently have."

Martin said the government had not delivered on that promise, but that "it has actually gotten worse."

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