Gormley: No breed exemptions in animal welfare legislation

Gormley: No breed exemptions in animal welfare legislation

Environment Minister and Green Party leader John Gormley today dismissed claims the latest piece of animal welfare legislation has been altered to appease greyhound and hunting circles.

Independent TD Michael Lowry twice claimed he has been given assurances the dogs will not be subject to strict new breeding and welfare rules to limit puppy farms and prevent abuse.

But a spokesman for the minister said the proposed laws will not carry exemptions for certain breeds and further legislation to cover greyhounds is due in the autumn.

Government supporter Mr Lowry claimed Government Chief Whip John Curran confirmed last night and again this morning that significant amendments would be made to the Dog Breeding Establishments Bill.

But an official in the minister’s office claimed any apparent conflict is only a matter of semantics and emphasis.

“This issue is well on the way to being resolved,” a spokesman added.

Final details of the proposed legislation on dog breeding, including amendments, are expected to be published tomorrow. It is due to be voted on at the Dáil next week.

Hunting packs will not be exempt from the new legislation but masters will not have to pay fees while rules on the amount bitches can breed will be spread over three years rather than one.

The law is expected to come into force next year.

In the meantime a separate welfare inspection regime is to be drawn up in the autumn to regulate the greyhound industry. It is understood local authority staff will work with officials from the Greyhound Board to carry out inspections and ensure standards are maintained.

Mr Lowry had claimed hunt groups should be exempt from the bill and greyhounds removed altogether amid fears the new regimes and fees will put breeding businesses in jeopardy.


More in this Section

Gardaí talk to three people as investigation into Cork father set on fire continuesGardaí talk to three people as investigation into Cork father set on fire continues

Garda tells inquest he shot Mark Hennessy as he believed he was about to slit Jastine Valdez's throatGarda tells inquest he shot Mark Hennessy as he believed he was about to slit Jastine Valdez's throat

Michael McGrath: Fianna Fáil not kicking pension decisions down the roadMichael McGrath: Fianna Fáil not kicking pension decisions down the road

Cork-based cybersecurity firm warn of 300% increase in cyber attacks from Iran Cork-based cybersecurity firm warn of 300% increase in cyber attacks from Iran


Lifestyle

Dr Sarah Miller is the CEO of Dublin’s Rediscovery Centre, the national centre for the Circular Economy in Ireland. She has a degree in Biotechnology and a PHD in Environmental Science in Waste Conversion Technologies.‘We have to give people positive messages’

When I was pregnant with Joan, I knew she was a girl. We didn’t find out the gender of the baby, but I just knew. Or else, I so badly wanted a girl, I convinced myself that is exactly what we were having.Mum's the Word: I have a confession: I never wanted sons. I wanted daughters

What is it about the teenage years that are so problematic for families? Why does the teenage soul rage against the machine of the adult world?Learning Points: It’s not about the phone, it’s about you and your teen

Judy Collins is 80, and still touring. As she gets ready to return to Ireland, she tells Ellie O’Byrne about the songs that have mattered most in her incredible 60-year career.The songs that matter most to Judy Collins from her 60-year career

More From The Irish Examiner